An integrative approach to healing ourselves and our world: honoring people, plants, planet

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Journey into Mindful Eating

At Crabtree Farms, Chattanooga’s community-focused, urban, sustainable agriculture farm.

Feb 4th, 1pm-4pm, $40

Step into the new year with the clarity of eating from a place of mindfulness and balance. Holli Richey, Registered Herbalist with the American Herbalist Guild and a psychotherapist practicing in Chattanooga, will guide participants through an afternoon of learning more heart-fully the art of eating from a conscious place.

This workshop will combine tangible ways in which to eat more mindfully, while also engaging in a serene and centering group eating experience.

Holli was a creator and facilitator of a year-long mindful eating program at Center for Integrative Medicine. This workshop will be an experiential, condensed version with lots of applicable tools to nurture a balanced practice of eating forever.

Why Wilderness?

Tellico Wild reconnects people with the wilderness.   http://wildsidetv.com/video/tellico-wild/

In August 2015, Tennessee’s Wildside adventured into the Tennessee Citico Wilderness to film naturalists and people seeking a day of reconnecting with their wild side. Bill and Laura Hodge organized the event, sponsored by Wild South and SAWS. I was honored to have Tennessee Wildside come along to film the edible and medicinal plant hike I led to Fall Branch Falls. This is one of my favorite areas in East Tennessee’s Wilderness region. Medicinal plants abound right at the trailhead and throughout the entire hike. In August, it is a cool, moist day in the 70s, a refuge in the southern heat.

It’s winter now as I post this, but at the end of February, the earliest of spring ephemeral wildflowers will soon emerge. Once the days start getting longer after the winter solstice, I’m already dreaming of spring wildflowers. I post this now to remind us of the beauty to come, and urge people to get out and enjoy our precious wilderness areas in 2017. I’ll be leading some edible and medicinal hikes this year. Stay tuned!

And PLEASE! contact TN Congressman Chuck Fleischmann to tell him to sign the Tennessee Wilderness Act. It takes an act of congress to protect Wilderness forever, which is a forever “thank you” to those who made it happen. Wilderness is where you can lose your urban worries, and find the wild heartbeat in your soul. Don’t you think we need that right now?

To watch the 5 minute video on Tellico Wild, including some of my hike, click this link:

http://wildsidetv.com/video/tellico-wild/

I hope you make it out into the wilderness this year. You can be transformed in just one hike.

 

Announcement! Holli Richey LCSW, RH is moving to a new practice!

mortar & pestle, 1920 materia medica book

My mortar & pestle, and a 1920 Domestic Medical Practice text. This book contains a materia medica, which are the materials of medicine. In 1920 there were mostly herbs.

What a way to begin the New Year!  I will be offering a FULL BLEND of holistic psychotherapy consisting of psychotherapy plus herbal medicine at the Chattanooga Center for Mind-Body Therapy. This is very exciting because I will have my full herbal apothecary on-site to formulate and blend personalized medicinal formulas for clients when appropriate to help support healing. Herbal medicine can be a valuable help to ease emotional, mental and physical stress, which can be included in a person’s pharmaceutical regimen without conflicting with the meds. I’m always happy to work with a client’s psychiatrist and primary care provider to ensure safety, efficacy and best standard of care.

I will continue to provide Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy and EMDR treatment, and will soon provide classes and groups at the new location. Stay tuned for classes, groups, and plant walks by subscribing to hollirichey.com blog.

Chattanooga Center for Mind-Body Therapy is located in the same building as Nutrition World on Lee HWY near the HWY 153 intersection. 6245 Vance Road, Suite 109, Chattanooga, TN 37421. Call (423)244-5918 to schedule an appointment.

Plus, I will still be at Erlanger’s Southside Community Health Center at least two days a week to provide psychotherapy for clients with Medicare, TNCare and TriCare, (423)778-2700.

I look forward to seeing you!

 

Cumberland Trail State Park Spring Festival

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Join me for an edible & medicinal wildflower walk at North Chick Creek near Ivy Academy, April 16th, 10:30 am. We will caravan from Ivy Academy. $5 per person/$10 per family. For more information go to Cumberland Trail’s Facebook Page and The Friends of the Cumberland Trail website.

Upcoming Herbal Walks & Talks

Bear corn, squawroot, cancer-root are a few names of this non-photosynthesizing parasitic plant commonly found under oak trees.

Bear corn, squawroot, cancer-root are a few names of this non-photosynthesizing parasitic plant commonly found under oak trees.

Hello Plant Friends,

The following are herbal walks and talks that I will be leading throughout the remainder of this year. I hope to see you!  -Holli

August 23rd, WILDERNESS WILD FEST: A celebration festival of the Wilderness Act’s 50th Anniversary

At Outdoor Chattanooga/Coolidge Park, Park 200 River Street, Chattanooga, TN

Free family event hosted by the Sierra Club and Outdoor Chattanooga

Holli will be leading an edible plant walk at 4pm. Sign up inside.

http://www.wildernessacts50thanniversarycelebrationfestival.com/

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September 12-14, FALL NATIVE PLANT SALE

At Reflection Riding Arboretum & Nature Center, 400 Garden Rd, Chattanooga, TN

Holli will be leading a Fall Foraging Event Saturday, Sept 13, from 11:30-1pm. Admission is free.

http://chattanooganaturecenter.org/www/docs/150

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October 10-12, SOUTHEAST WISE WOMEN HERBAL CONFERENCE, 10th Anniversary

At Black Mountain, NC

Holli will be leading a Medicinal Plant Walk and a Forest Bathing Walk

Register at http://www.sewisewomen.com/

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November 6-10, AMERICAN HERBALISTS GUILD SYMPOSIUM, 25th Anniversary

At Callaway Gardens, Pine Mountain, Georgia

Holli will be presenting two lectures:

Emotionally-Focused Herbal Therapy: An herbalist’s role in supporting people experiencing mood disorders, anxiety and trauma disorders

Integrative Medicine Clinics: Models of collaborative care

Register at http://www.americanherbalistsguild.com/

 

Love Medicine: Traditional and Scientific Uses of Herbs for Love

Nature loves. It shows its heart if you look.

Nature loves. It shows its heart if you look.

In his song “Nature Boy,” Nat King Cole sings, “The greatest thing you have to learn is just to love, and be loved in return.” Nature is abundant with plants that help us learn to love and be loved in return—and not all of them are for the Viagra-kind of love.

The quest for romantic love is a part of the human condition. Daniel Moerman, author of Native American Ethnobotany, recorded over a hundred stories of Native American tribes using plants as love charms to lure a potential suitor. For instance, the Iroquois considered asters, which are daisy-like flowers, to be love medicine. Perhaps asters were used like the he-loves-me-he-loves-me-not daisy method of divining a suitor’s sincerity, or they could have been knotted into chains like dandelion-flower necklaces.

Several tribes used powdered seeds of Columbine to be sprinkled as a kind of love-dust. Other tribes marked a man’s palm with bloodroot, a native wildflower aptly named for the blood-red liquid which oozes from a cut root.

As a more drastic measure—and maybe a last resort for the desperate and restless—yellow dock root was boiled and splashed on the face and clothes to make one more appealing to a love interest. Though, anyone who has seen yellow dock root knows it makes a yellow-staining dye, and therefore, it seems the amorous seeker would be made quite obvious.

Contemporary use of aphrodisiac herbs include performance-enhancing herbs, such as yohimbe or Asian ginseng, which increase virility for men, or female tonics, which help maintain sexual function, such as an herb from India called shatavari, which means “she who has a hundred husbands.” The name conveys its efficacy.

For relaxing into a romantic relationship, damiana (Turnera aphrodisiaca or Turnera diffusa) is a traditional herbal beverage, either as a tea or as a Mexican herbal liqueur. Supported by scientific studies, damiana is considered to be a mild antidepressant and nervine, which relaxes and calms the nerves so that a couple isn’t too stressed out to be interested in each other.

Passionflower helps with marriage maintenance.

Passionflower helps with marriage maintenance.

For marriage maintenance, old-timey Appalachian herbalists revived tired domestic partnerships with passionflower vine, appropriate for couples who’ve grown bored in a relationship, having lost the appreciation for the familiar. A recent clinical trial has proven passionflower as effective for anxiety as an anti-anxiety pharmaceutical benzodiazepine, which would likely help the relationship, as well.

More than just finding and keeping a romance, love medicine can foster a sense of togetherness, which is needed in building and maintaining all relationships. Since communication is the key to maintaining healthy relationships, kava kava, a Polynesian herb which means “talk talk,” could be of value. Kava kava has been traditionally used to ease communication and facilitate a win-win conversation when different tribes join together in conversation.

A farmer's market potato heart.

A farmer’s market potato heart.

Most importantly, all love is built upon a compassionate, forgiving self-love. Cultivating self-love involves physically, spiritually and emotionally healing the wounds of the heart, so that one can be open to feeling love for others and allowing oneself to receive love. Reishi mushroom and hawthorn are used as herbal tonics to heal and support the heart on a physical, emotional and spiritual level. By nourishing the heart with antioxidants, and calming the emotional and spiritual mind which, according to Traditional Chinese medicine, resides in the heart, reishi and hawthorn prepare someone to learn to love and be loved in return.

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